Thanks to a number of new partners soon to be announced, Rewilding Australia has been making big plans for continuing their work in the coming year. With the Eastern quoll extinct on mainland Australia and populations potentially in decline in Tasmania, it is vital these programs continue. Working with Devils@Cradle and Trowunna Wildlife Park, RA is expanding captive breeding facilities and Conjour is proud to be helping.

 


 

Supporting the [Un]dramatic

In a conservation world filled with dramatic animal captures and tagging caught on film, and documentaries on the fight against gun-wielding poachers and deforestation, it is often the little things that those on the ground say they struggle to keep up with.

The ‘boring’ stuff – things like admin costs, protective gear and proper equipment – goes under the radar. However, these aspects of conservation are just as important as modern drones for footage, high-tech GPS gadgets and the like. And we’re proud to be able to help in this regard.

 


 

Enabling Eastern Quoll Transportation

The first stage in our support of RA has been completed: enabling the construction of twenty new wildlife transportation crates (you can see one in progress in the image above). These will ensure that quolls being moved between breeding facilities and reintroduction sites reach their destination safely without fear of injury, excessive induced stress, or the risk of biological contamination.

The boxes measure 46cm long, 32cm wide and 36cm in height – just right for an Eastern quoll.

Rob Brewster, Managing Director of Rewilding Australia, says they already have plans for the cases, including moving quolls for proposed reintroductions, but that they will also be made available for other organisations for whom they can be of use.

Lots of news is coming up from RA in the coming weeks, including a call to arms for the public, so subscribe to our newsletter below to be kept up to date and to show your support!

 
 

You might also like: What is the Eastern quoll?

 
 

Captions and credits for images, from top-down:
– Eastern quoll Fawn – By Ways (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
– Tasmania forest – By anyaka [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
– Wildlife Transportation Case – In Progress. Image courtesy of Rob Brewster, Rewilding Australia 2017